Cinequipwhite's Blog


New Website!!! by cinequipwhite
January 19, 2012, 5:52 pm
Filed under: News | Tags: , , , , ,

Hello everyone!
You have probably noticed there hasn’t been too much going on in CinequipWhite Blog world, and you would be completely right. The reason behind that is we have moved the blog to a new location on the CinequipWhite website itself!
Look under ‘News’ and connect with our new posts. You’ll be glad you did.

www.cinequipwhite.com

See you there!

~Jonathan Stainton
CinequipWhite Inc.

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The Canon C300 is HERE! by cinequipwhite

Literally FRESH off the stage from Canon is the announcement of their new video-centric, removable lens camera the C300. Canon has had a rich history of professional quality in its video and photography equipment, so it doesn’t come as a surprise to most people that the next in their lineup of digital cinema devices is this Super 35mm equivalent CMOS camera. This innovative new Super 35mm chip is able to reduce rolling shutter effects and decrease moire artifacts. Many of the common downsides of current CMOS cameras are going to be almost unnoticeable in the C300.

It’s a serious step up from their DSLR bodies, and boy is that a relief. They have taken into account all of the functionality that was missing with the 5d mkII, 7D and to a lesser extent the T2i, and turned what is already a mainstay in production into what is sure to become a legend in the film and television industry. They still have kept the small form factor though. At only 3.5lbs it’s still small enough to get into the tight spaces full size rigs can’t quite get into.

It’s modular like the RED camera, but unlike RED it’s ready to integrate into your existing equipment, surely to save thousands of dollars as a result. For those who really want to maintain the high quality lenses they may already have for use with other cameras, there is a PL mount option available to take those beautiful PL pieces of glass you have perhaps just purchased.

It records onto 2 separate CF cards, giving individual or simultaneous recording options for immediate backup. No more corrupt cards or lost media. This is a security feature that really brings safety into the mix. It records as 50Mbps MPEG-2 4:2:2 MXF files in a variety of frame rates selectable at 1fps intervals for fast and slow motion. It also has a sure to be coveted 24.00 fps mode added in which means there’s no need for 2:3 pulldown or Telecine conversion for film integration. It’s ready for editing right out of the camera. On 2 32GB CF cards you could record up to 2 hours of footage.

When it comes to industry standard, the C300 kicks everyone else to the curb. It comes standard with Timecode, Gen Lock, HD-SDI, and HDMI outputs, as well as built in electronically switchable ND filters, XLR inputs, and something that is surely to take the community by storm – Wireless control with smartphone devices and tablets over wi-fi; giving you the option of wirelessly focusing with EF lenses, setting aperture values, and even entering Metadata.

Demo units will be shipping soon, so call in about checking it out. It is the ‘Must have’ camera for anyone looking to upgrade from a 5d mkII or a 7D, and it’s home is CinequipWhite Inc.

Also, keep your eye out for Canon’s new EF Cine prime lenses coming out starting the first half of 2012.

~Jonathan Stainton
CinequipWhite Inc.



New Kino Gear by cinequipwhite
November 29, 2010, 11:15 am
Filed under: Demos, Gear, Interview, Lighting, Update! | Tags: , , , , , , ,


First Panasonic AF100 review hits the interwebs! by cinequipwhite
September 10, 2010, 9:52 am
Filed under: Cameras, Gear, News, Update! | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Looks like Barry Greene got his hands on the new micro four thirds wonder that is the AF100.  And the results? Astounding. It looks more and more like this is the camera people are going to be aspiring to.

Here is his review:

“I’m posting this from the show floor at IBC, where the first working prototypes of the AF100 are being shown to the public. I’ve had the luxury of working with the pre-production AF101, which is the European model of the AF100. Same basic camera, because all of them are NTSC/PAL switchable.

This prototype isn’t finished yet, so I can’t say some things definitively, but I can say this – I’m done with shooting on DSLRs. This thing is the bomb.

It is basically everything that I was expecting/hoping it to be, and more. I mean, I was expecting an HPX170 with DSLR-style shallow DOF, and yeah, that’s it. What I wasn’t expecting was variable frame rates up to 1080/60p. I was hoping for things like 2.35:1 frame markings in the viewfinder, and yeah, it’s got it. I was expecting things like zebras, waveform monitor, vectorscope, uncompressed audio, XLRs, line/mic/phantom power controls, manual audio, pre-record, interval recording, and everything else that the HPX170 does, and it has pretty much all of that (I didn’t see time-stamp for legal video, but … seriously, this isn’t a legal videography camcorder! Although, it could be, I guess).

I wasn’t expecting simultaneous HDMI and HD-SDI output, that’s really pretty awesome. You can use a cheap HDMI monitor, and use the HD-SDI to record to a NanoFlash or KiPro or whatever, simultaneously. Cool.

I was expecting timecode. I wasn’t expecting the ability to sync timecode through LTC (like the HMC150 has) so you can easily sync to timecode slates, to external sound recorders, or to other camcorders in a multi-camera shoot.

I was hoping for (well, demanding really, but it amounts to “hoping for”) a high-def LCD, and yes, that’s what it has. High-def LCD and high-def viewfinder. But what I wasn’t expecting is that they said that in the final model, the LCD will actually be better than the one on the HPX370. That’s really good news!

I was hoping to be able to remove the top handle, and you can. I wasn’t expecting to be able to remove the side handgrip, but you can – which lets you strip the unit down to a fairly small box, and also reveals three 1/4-20 mounting holes on the side, which I can just imagine people will be using to attach all sorts of accessories, Red-style. Now that I’ve seen those two items come off, I really wanted them to make the viewfinder/XLR pod removable, so you could strip it down to a totally svelte box, but that’s not possible. I have asked them to consider this for a future version, as that’d be really cool.

I was pretty happy to be setting the sensitivity by ISO instead of by gain levels. But you can do both, at least in this prototype.

As for images – well, imagine a fully-hacked, fully-improved GH13 with better sensitivity and without the aliasing or low-light banding, and that’s a good start. It crushes the 7D/5D for clarity and detail, and I shot brick buildings at every possible zoom setting, and there just isn’t any rainbow moire. Finally! You can do a wide-angle, deep-focus shot without any fear of the camcorder ruining the shot! And your talent can wear corduroy, or fine-striped shirts, without turning into a huge purple/orange smear! But I can’t really comment too much on the imagery, because it’s not done yet – by their estimates, it’s only at about 70% of completion, and they expect to be able to improve it and make it even better by release time. Which is really promising, because while it’s not perfect, already it’s better than what people are going to be comparing it to.

I put on my Zeiss ZF 85mm and 50mm, also used a hyper-sharp Olympus 14-35, and at the booth they have a Zeiss Compact Prime 35mm. And, I used the GH1’s 14-140 and I even mounted on the GH1’s compact pancake 20mm lens, which looked preposterously tiny on such a big body, but really it was pretty darn cool. The 14-140 makes the AF100 into basically a complete video camera, the autofocus is smooth and nice, the zoom is manual but not too shabby, and the range is great (even if the minimum f-stop isn’t). With my 85mm and 50mm (both f/1.4) super-extremely-shallow DOF was extremely easy to achieve.

Can’t speak to price yet, that’s not been released and won’t be until the press conference, which is scheduled for 7:00 p.m. tonight (which is about eight and a half hours from now).

Now, keep in mind that everything is subject to change. They might add more features, or they might take some away. It’s a pre-production prototype so it’s very early, and (to borrow a line from Red) “everything is subject to change.”

Skew? Hugely improved. Didn’t get to do a comparison test, but the 24p skew of the AF101 felt like it was at least as good as the HPX370/EX1.

I am sooo not disappointed. They have built pretty much exactly what I was hoping for. There are things I’d like to see added before it’s released, obviously, and no we didn’t get some of the wild things we were hoping for (like a new 50-megabit 4:2:2 AVC codec) but what we did get is pretty much exactly what we needed – better-than-DSLR imagery in a professional, proper video body, with all the conveniences and features that pro video shooters are used to.”

Special thanks for DVXUSER.com, and Barry Greene!

~Jonathan Stainton
CinequipWhite Inc.



Introducing the Panasonic HDC-SDT750 3D camcorder by cinequipwhite
July 28, 2010, 4:18 pm
Filed under: Cameras, Gear | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Following the trend of new tech accessibility, panasonic has just unveiled their new consumer 3D handheld camcorder. The HDC-SDT750 3D camera is aimed directly at the amateur crowd, with most of the adjustments being automatic.

The unit comes with a handheld full HD camcorder, and a lens attachment to convert it into a side by side recording device. Sure it loses half the horizontal resolution, but it brings 3D to your fingertips at $1400 USD.

For more information on Side by side 3D images click here

It shoots with side-by-side 3D, which would need to be properly imported, so they have also bundled their editing software with the kit for quick and easy usage. All you need at that point is a home 3D Theatre!

 

Some specs from Panasonic:

PANASONIC UNVEILS THE WORLD’S FIRST 3D CONSUMER CAMCORDER, COMPLETE WITH A 3D CONVERSION LENS*1
New Panasonic HDC-SDT750 Shoots 3D Video Ready to Play Back on 3D-Capable Televisions, Perfect for Creating a 3D Entertainment Ecosystem at Home

SECAUCUS, NJ (July 27, 2010) – Panasonic today announced the launch of the Panasonic HDC-SDT750, the world’s first consumer 3D camcorder, which includes a 3D conversion lens*1 that enables the camcorder to shoot powerful and true-to-life 3D video content. The Panasonic SDT750 is a user-friendly consumer 3D camcorder that makes experiencing 3D at home easy and affordable*2. In addition to shooting 3D, the SDT750 can record full 1080p High Definition (HD) in AVCHD, when the 3D conversion lens is unattached, and includes powerful features such as a 3MOS system, a Leica Dicomar lens and a 12x optical zoom.

“As a result of research conducted through Panasonic Hollywood Laboratory, Panasonic developed a professional 3D system camera and successfully brought high-quality Full HD 3D images to the home for viewing on Panasonic VIERA Full HD 3D televisions. But now, Panasonic has taken it one step further and developed the world’s first consumer 3D camcorder, the HDC-SDT750 – creating a 3D ecosystem available for consumers in the home,” said Chris Rice, Senior Product Manager, Imaging, Panasonic Consumer Electronics Company. “Incorporating Panasonic’s professional broadcast technology and bringing it to an easy-to-use consumer model, the SDT750 makes high-quality 3D video content a reality in the home.”

To shoot 3D video with the Panasonic HDC-SDT750 camcorder, the user needs to attach the 3D conversion lens that comes included, to record dynamic images. The specially-designed 3D conversion lens records right-eye and left-eye images simultaneously through its two lenses, thus resulting in video that can be viewed in 3D. The right and left images (each with 960 x 1080 pixels) that enter through the lenses are recorded using the side-by-side method.

The Panasonic SDT750 features a Time Lapse Recording feature, which plays a scene such as a sunset or a blooming flower at an accelerated speed, similar to a fast-forward. By setting the recording interval to 1 second, 10 seconds, 30 seconds, 1 minute or 2 minutes, the user can view an otherwise long recording in a reduced time period. For example, when a scene is recorded at the 1-second interval setting, a 10-minute sunset scene can be played back in approximately 10 seconds, making the slow change in the subject appear as if it were taking place in a very short time. This interval recording feature is also available when the 3D conversion lens is attached to the SDT750.

Panasonic offers a 5.1-channel audio recording sound system that uses five microphones, so when voices are recorded from the front, right, left and back are played on a 5.1-channel home cinema system, users are surrounded by clear, detailed sound that makes them feel as if they are right in the middle of the action. The Focus Microphone function, which has been made possible by five highly-directional microphones, picks up the sounds from sources in the area in front of the camcorder, regardless of whether the lens is focusing on a near or distant object. It also allows footage recorded in 3D to be enjoyed with lifelike and dynamic sounds.

The high-sensitivity 3MOS System has 7.59 million effective motion image pixels (2.53 megapixels x 3), so this advanced image sensor separates the light received through the lens into the three primary colors – red, green and blue – and processes each color independently. As a result, the Panasonic SDT750 produces beautiful images with rich color quality, detail and gradation. Adding to the quality, the SDT750 also features a large-diameter (46mm) F1.5*3 Leica Dicomar lens and Crystal Engine PRO, a high-speed processing unit – both components which contribute to the effectiveness of the camcorder’s light gathering, increased sensitivity, and reduced noise when shooting, even in dim lighting.

Users can play back 3D videos recorded on the Panasonic HDC-SDT750 on 3D-capable televisions, such as Panasonic VIERA® Full HD 3D televisions, including the TC-P50VT25, TC-P54VT25, TC-P58VT25, TC-P65VT25 and the TC-P50VT20 models. Playback using a VIERA TV is done by connecting the 3D camcorder to the television using an HDMI cable. In addition, it is also possible to play 3D images recorded on SD Memory Cards by using an AVCHD compatible player,*4 such as a Panasonic 3D Blu-ray Disc player – the DMP-BDT350 or DMP-BDT300 models are currently available. When watching 3D content recorded by the SDT750 on any of the Panasonic Full HD 3D VIERA televisions, users can view the true-to-life content and the VIERA television will automatically engage the side-by-side method for smooth viewing of 3D content – no change of settings necessary.

The SDT750 comes with HD Writer AE 2.6T PC editing software, which allows users to easily edit recorded 3D images, and save them onto PCs or Blu-ray/DVD discs. HD Writer AE 2.6T features a “Smart Wizard” that starts as soon as the SDT750 is connected to the USB port of the computer, which gives simple on-screen guidance. HD Writer AE 2.6T also enables easy uploading and sharing online without the need for any cumbersome processes, so that even an inexperienced user can post video clips on the web. When uploading 3D images from a PC onto the web, they must first be converted into 2D images.

Even without the 3D conversion lens attached, the Panasonic SDT750 is an innovative and high-performance Full HD camcorder that is equipped with a wide range of sophisticated functions, including the 3MOS System, which features improved noise reduction (NR) technologies, and a wide-variety of manual adjustments controlled by a manual ring for easy, creative shooting. The manual ring provides convenient, fingertip control of the focus, zoom, exposure (iris), shutter speed and white balance settings. Using the ring is extremely intuitive, comfortable, and user-friendly. Only the white balance setting is available when the 3D conversion lens is attached. The SDT750 can shoot 1,080/60p recording (Full-HD 1,920 x 1,080, 60 progressive recording) and produces rich expressive images, with no detail loss and flickering.

Panasonic’s Intelligent Auto (iA) function makes the SDT750 extremely easy to use. When the 3D lens is not attached and iA is engaged, the SDT750 automatically selects the most suitable shooting mode with the press of a button. While shooting HD video, the Panasonic SDT750’s iA function offers the following six functions: Face Recognition, the new HYBRID O.I.S., AF/AE Tracking, Intelligent Scene Selector, Face Detection and Intelligent Contrast Control. HYBRID O.I.S., a new feature, provides extremely accurate hand-shake correction with its four-axis blur detection, resulting in steady images while zooming or shooting on the move.

Other features of the Panasonic HDC-SDT750 include:

-Auto Power LCD automatically adjusts the brightness of the screen according to the shooting environment for comfortable use in a variety of different lighting situations.
-Large 3.0″ touch-screen LCD allows icons to be easily operated by touching them with a fingertip. On the -LCD, recorded 3D images are displayed only as the 2D images that were recorded with the left lens.
-Eco Mode automatically turns off the power when the camcorder is not operated for five minutes, reducing wasteful energy use and saving battery power.
-Pre-Rec allows for the camcorder to continuously record three seconds of content into internal memory. Then, when the record button is pressed, the three seconds immediately prior will have been recorded.

The Panasonic HDC-SDT750 will be available in October 2010 with a suggested retail price of $1,399.95. For more information on Panasonic camcorders, please visit: www.panasonic.com/dvc.

*1 As a consumer camcorder with 3D conversion lens for the AVCHD standard (as of July 27, 2010).
*2 A TV that is capable of side-by-side method 3D playback, 3D Eyewear, and HDMI cable connection are required to play the recorded 3D images.
*3 F3.2 when the 3D conversion lens is attached.
*4 If the player/recorder is incompatible with 3D, the 3D mode must be set on the TV manually
*Design and specifications are subject to change without notice.

Special thanks to Gizmodo for the heads up.

~Jonathan Stainton
CinequipWhite Inc.



New Panasonic Cameras from NAB by cinequipwhite
April 23, 2010, 9:43 am
Filed under: Cameras, Gear, Interview | Tags: , , , , , , , ,


Panasonic’s new HPX370 by cinequipwhite
April 7, 2010, 12:24 pm
Filed under: Cameras, Gear, News | Tags: , , , , , , ,

With a new, advanced 1/3″ 2.2-megapixel 3-chip imager featuring Ultra Luminance Technology (U.L.T.), the HPX370 delivers exceptional video performance for master-quality HD production. The shoulder-mount camcorder offers 10-bit, 4:2:2, full 1920 x 1080-resolution AVC-Intra recording with impressive levels of sensitivity and an interchangeable lens. The AVC-Intra codec is unrivaled for its full-raster, 10-bit, 4:2:2 sampling with none of the inherent compromises of 8-bit, long GOP and 4:2:0 recording. The HPX370 provides the ultra reliability of a solid-state design and the faster speed of a file-based workflow.

The HPX370 utilizes a 20-bit digital signal processor and high-resolution 3-MOS imagers, enhanced with U.L.T., which boosts the sensors’ performance to rival the image quality and sensitive of ½” imagers. The new U.L.T. sensor results in marked improvements in sensitivity, measured at F10. These high levels of sensitivity and image quality have been achieved with a new high-sensitivity photodiode and low-noise pixel transistor, both based on low-noise analog process technology. The same levels of sensitivity and image production that characterize the interlace mode are now possible in the progressive mode courtesy of Progressive Advanced Processing (P.A.P.), a 3D adaptive processing technology.

 

With the flexibility of an interchangeable lens, the HPX370 can be used with 1/3″ to 2/3″ lens adapters for use with existing 2/3″ zoom and prime lenses. The camera offers a broad range of creative features including variable frame rates, advanced gamma functions including a new Cine film-like gamma, Chromatic Aberration Compensation (CAC), built-in scan reverse, Dynamic Range Stretch (DRS) function, waveform and vector scope display and focus assist tools. The HPX370 also comes equipped with flash band detection and compensation software built-in for improved CMOS performance.